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Q: How do I remove face paint?

A: Always follow these steps to remove paint before bedtime:

1. Lather design with a mild soap, such as baby shampoo.

2. Wipe away with a warm, wet wash cloth. (Use an old one, because face paints may stain cloth.)

3. If necessary, lather and wipe again. Remember that some dark colors may stain skin slightly temporarily, but if you begin with soap only, this is less likely.

Read the label if you must use baby wipes to remove face paint. Some children have reactions to some brands of wet wipes. In general, it is best to avoid using wipes for removing face paint.

The gem adhesive may be removed with a little rubbing alcohol or baby oil on a q-tip, always being careful to stay away from the eyes.

Q: Are you insured?

A: Yes.

 

Q: How far do you travel?

A: I travel to the most NW Chicago suburbs and some of the north and west side of Chicago as well as Rockford including but not limited to the following suburbs:

Addison, Algonquin, Arlington Heights, Aurora, Barrington, Lake Barrington, South Barrington, Bartlett, Batavia, Belvidere, Bensenville, Bloomingdales, Bolingbrook, Brookfield, Buffalo Grove, Bull Valley, Burlington, Burr Ridge, Campton Hills, Carol Stream, Carpentersville, Cary, Charter Grove, Cherry Valley, Clare, Coral, Colvin Park, Cortland, Countryside, Crest Hill, Crystal Lake, Deer Park, Deerfield, DeKalb, Downers Grove, East Dundee, West Dundee, Elburn, Elgin, South Elgin, Elk Grove Village, Elmhurst, Elmwood Park, Eola, Evanston, Forest Park, Fox River Grove, Franklin Park, Garden Prairie, Geneva, Genoa, Gilberts, Glen Ellyn, Glencoe, Glendale Heights, Grayslake, Gurney, Hampshire, Hartland, Harmony, Hawthorn Woods, Herbert, Highland Park, Hoffman Estates, Holiday Hills, Huntley, Inverness, Island Lake, Itasca, Ivanhoe, Joliet, Keeneyville, Kenilworth, Killdeer, Kingston, Kirkland, La Fox, La Grange, Lake Forest, Lake in the Hills, Lake Villa, Lake Zurich, Lakemoor, Village of Lakewood, Lemont, Libertyville, Lily Lake, Lincolnshire, Lisle, Lombard, Long Grove, Lyons, Malta, Maple Park, Marengo, McHenry, Medinah, Melrose Park, Mettawa, Montgomery, Mooseheart, Morton Grove, Mount Prospect, Mundelein, Naperville, New Lebanon, Niles, Norridge, North Aurora, North Barrington, Northbrook, Northfield, Northlake, Nottingham Woods, Oak Brook, Oak Park, Oakbrook Terrace, Oakwood Hills, Orland Park, Oswego, Palatine, Park Ridge, Pingree Grove, Plainfield, Plato Center, Port Barrington, Prairie Grove, Prospect Heights, River Forest, River Grove, Riverwoods, Rockford, Rolling Meadows, Romeoville, Roselle, Rosemont, Round Lake, Round Lake Beach, Schaumburg, Schiller Park, Skokie, Sleepy Hollow, Spring Grove, St. Charles, Starks, Stone Park, Streamwood, Sugar Grove, Sutton, Sycamore, Sylvan Lake, Tower Lakes, Union, Vernon Hills, Villa Park, Village of Lakewood, Virgil, Volo, Wadsworth, Warrenville, Wauconda, Waukegan, Wauconda, Wayne, West Chicago, Weschester, Western Springs, Vestment, Wheaton, Wheeling, Willow Springs, Willowbrook, Wilmette, Winfield, Winnetka, Wonder Lake, Wood Dale, Woodridge, Woodstock.

Q: Can the paints cause allergic reactions?

A: Any substance can cause an allergic reaction, but face paints are made to be as hypoallergenic as possible. I have never had a child or adult have a reaction to my paints, which are professional grade and FDA compliant. If you have a concern about your child being sensitive to face paint, request a test patch on the child’s arm before he or she is painted. Also, if a person has had any allergic reactions in the past, he or she should refrain from being painted. (Keep in mind that sometimes the cause of an allergic reaction is what people use to remove face paint. Only use mild soap and water to remove face paint.)

If you’re concerned about a possible reaction, let me know before your party and we can check ingredients and choose which brand would be best to use for your child.

For insurance purposes, the neon colors I use are all FDA compliant.

Q: Do you do balloon twisting as well?

A: Only if you want a simple dog or a sword. (That’s all I’m able to do!) If you’re looking for a balloon artist in the NW suburbs, I have a list of skilled balloon twisters I can recommend for your event.

Q: What other types of art do you do?

A: I have a BA in Art and originally was an artist/designer in the publishing industry. I currently teach acrylic painting and drawing to children and adults.

Q: Where do you get your designs?

A: I get ideas from other face painters and from my imagination. I’ve been fortunate to learn from many talented artists, such as Cameron Garrett, Heather Green, Marcela Murad, and many others. I’m continually training through online classes and local workshops with face painting master artists.  One of my favorite workshops was by European artist Olga Murasev, who toured the United States recently.

I also attend face painting and body conventions so I can receive extra instruction.

 

Q: When I see face painters using acrylic paints to do face painting, should I let my kids get face painted?

A: No. With the amazing array of gorgeous FDA compliant face paints available for face painters, it is a poor business practice for a face painter to use acrylic paints on a child’s skin. In some cases, the artist may not be aware that acrylic paint should not be applied to the skin. It’s also possible the artist is trying to cut corners, since acrylic paints are cheap compared to professional quality face paints. However, as it is unlikely that any liability insurance will cover a face painter who uses acrylic paint, you are taking a risk in allowing acrylics to be applied to your child.

Acrylic paint, although usually non-toxic, contains ingredients and chemicals not designed for use on skin. The manufacturers of acrylics state that acrylics should never be used on skin for temporary tattoos. For more information on acrylic paints and why they are inappropriate for face painting, stop by these links: University of YorkSubstances & Technologies, and Art Materials Safety.

Also keep in mind that the only glitter used for face painting should be cosmetic glitter. Craft glitter is dangerous when used on the face, because it can cut the eye.

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